Quotes & Inspirations – The Fine Print Blog //wp.readers.com/blog by Readers.com Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:33:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 //wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 //wp.readers.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-Rea-newFavicon-2016-Final-32x32.png Quotes & Inspirations – The Fine Print Blog //wp.readers.com/blog 32 32 50 Fall Activities to Try This Season //wp.readers.com/blog/50-fall-activities/ Mon, 08 Aug 2016 19:39:34 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13540 Say goodbye to summer and hello to fall! While some might be sad to see summer go, we’re excited for all the exciting activities that are unique to the season. If you’re looking for things to do this fall, get started with our checklist for a little bit of inspiration. Spoiler: there are a lot of pumpkin activities.

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Say goodbye to summer and hello to fall! While some might be sad to see summer go, we’re excited for all the exciting activities that are unique to the season. If you’re looking for things to do this fall, get started with our checklist for a little bit of inspiration. Spoiler: there are a lot of pumpkin activities.

fun fall activities

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Our Five Favorite Fathers in Literature //wp.readers.com/blog/five-favorite-fathers-in-literature/ Fri, 10 Jun 2016 20:51:56 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13419 As we know, fathers can be very powerful people in our lives. Although their styles may be different, many of us are who we are today because of how our fathers taught, loved, and cared for us throughout our lives. This Father’s Day, we look back at the great fathers we’ve come to know and love […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
As we know, fathers can be very powerful people in our lives. Although their styles may be different, many of us are who we are today because of how our fathers taught, loved, and cared for us throughout our lives. This Father’s Day, we look back at the great fathers we’ve come to know and love in literature and which qualities make them top notch role models.

books

1. Atticus Finch — The Leader

A leader, in any setting, sets the tone for how we interact with one another. They shape and construct the morals and values in each of their followers.  As a leader in the family, no father in literature accepts this role than Atticus Finch in To Kill a Mockingbird. In the face of conflict, Atticus took  a path that was filled with challenges and obstacles. He chose to show his children that every man is created equal no matter who they are are where they come from. This is no easy job, and our fathers face these types challenges everyday in their lives. Through their actions they plant the seeds in us that help us grow over time into the roots of our values.

2. Bob Cratchit — The Solace

Life is not always easy. We may find ourselves in a hard place, but our fathers help us to see the joy of being together as a family. In Charles Dickens’s magical story, The Christmas Carol, Bob Cratchit is the shining example of how to see the light in a world brimming in darkness. No matter how hard life may seem, Bob Cratchit, like many of our fathers, finds a way to bring out the joy in our lives and celebrate the true gift we receive everyday; our family.

3. Hans Hubermann — The Teacher

Our parents are our greatest teachers. They are constantly pushing us to become better and picking us up when fall down. No literary father loves teaching his child more than Hans Hubermann from the renowned novel The Book Thief. As the parent of an adopted child in a world surrounded by fear and violence, Hubermann devotes his life to educating his daughter the beauty of reading and imagination. In a community blinded by prejudice, Hubermann teaches his daughter to create a vision of the world through her own eyes, and not let others dictate how she thinks. Similar to our fathers, their love can be seen through their countless lessons and lectures with hope that we use this knowledge to create a life better than they have ever experienced.

4. Mrs. Doubtfire — The Comedian

On this day, we appreciate the countless times our dads made us smile when no one else could. Made famous by the motion picture, Mrs. Doubtfire is the father that will go the extra mile just to squeak a grin out of us. When a divorce causes him to be separated from his kids, this father dresses up as old nanny just to spend a few more hours each day laughing with his kids. While our fathers can seem so serious at times, they’re always the first to recognize whenever we need a bit of laughter in our lives.

5. The Giving Tree — The Giver

Finally, the last characteristic we admire in our fathers is their constant generosity in our lives. Whether it’s toys when we are young, countless nights of helping with math homework, or even walking you down the aisle on on your wedding day, our fathers are always willing to give whatever they have, just to make us happy. While not necessarily a human father, the tree in Shel Silverstein’s children’s book The Giving Tree is a perfect resemblance of a father figure who continues to give until he has nothing left. Our fathers serve us in any way they can, and as we grow older, our fathers sacrifice more and more just to sustain our happiness. It is not until we reach a certain age of maturity, that we are fully able to comprehend the the countless hours and energy our fathers have devoted towards providing us with a better life.

We hope that on this day of celebration, you are able to be thankful of all your father’s admirable qualities that have helped shape you into the person you are today.

It’s never too late to tell your father how thankful you are to have him in your life.

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
15 Thought-Provoking Quotes from Literature //wp.readers.com/blog/thought-provoking-quotes Tue, 07 Jun 2016 16:23:08 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13403 Oscar Wilde once said, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” This is especially true for the great books that are immortalized in paper and print for countless generations to enjoy. People fall crazy in love with characters in books, often because […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Oscar Wilde once said, “If one cannot enjoy reading a book over and over again, there is no use in reading it at all.” This is especially true for the great books that are immortalized in paper and print for countless generations to enjoy.

People fall crazy in love with characters in books, often because they embody an ideal which they fundamentally identify with. When these characters express something particularly moving or thought-provoking, we keep their words in our hearts, and repeat them whenever we get the chance.

Actions speak louder than words, but quotes are without a doubt more repeatable. They’re easily shareable, whether it’s vocally, on a shirt, on your bedroom wall, or even on a quilt. We looked at classic books to find some of the most beloved characters and their thought-provoking quotes that will live forever in print and in our hearts.

15 thought-provoking book quotes by Readers.com

Share this Image On Your Site

Did you recognize any of these quotes from the classics? It’s always satisfying to find a book you can thoroughly enjoy and get lost in. And while you may forget lots of minor details in the story, the powerful quotes you discover stick with you. Check out some bifocal glasses or make sure to clean your glasses so you can continue enjoying your favorite books.

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Five Reasons You Only Need to Make One Resolution This New Year //wp.readers.com/blog/only-make-one-resolution-this-year/ Wed, 30 Dec 2015 15:41:21 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13202 “Hello, babies. Welcome to Earth. It’s hot in the summer and cold in the winter. It’s round and wet and crowded. At the outside, babies, you’ve got about a hundred years here. There’s only one rule that I know of, babies—G** damn it, you’ve got to be kind.” Kurt Vonnegut. From God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater. […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
BeGoodToEachOther_750x420_2

“Hello, babies. Welcome to Earth. It’s hot in the summer and cold in the winter. It’s round and wet and crowded. At the outside, babies, you’ve got about a hundred years here. There’s only one rule that I know of, babies—G** damn it, you’ve got to be kind.”

Kurt Vonnegut. From God Bless You, Mr. Rosewater.

There’s only one resolution any of us need to make this year, and it’s this: to encourage ourselves and those around us to be kinder, better people; to look around for the hurt we can fix, the good we can do and the ways we can effectively help. Even the best of us have room to be more forgiving, more patient and more empathetic.

We could all learn to follow the Boy Scout campground rule socially and try to leave every person we meet better than we found them. It’s not just that being kind or fair makes us feel warm and fuzzy or gives us the chance to be smug when no one’s looking, it’s that treating each other well is a provably better way. There is even some speculation that the most efficient way to be selfish is to be generous; that we earn far more dividends in the long run by extending kindness than we do by being bitter or angry. Here are 5 reasons being kind is the only resolution you need to make this year:

1. Being Good to Others Lowers Your Blood Pressure

How many of us have tried cutting out salt, taking ACE inhibitors, losing weight, or giving up nightcaps, all in the name of getting our numbers down into a range that will make our doctors nod in approval? What if we could get part of the way there, have a head start, race ahead of the mall walking, dessert shunning and teetotalling to a better resting diastolic? What if that way was to give time or money to a charity organization that helps other human beings?

A study done by Piferi and Lawler in 2006 showed a direct correlation between charitable contribution and lower resting systolic pressure, diastolic pressure and heart rate. To make it even better, the same study showed a connection between those participants who gave social support and receiving greater “social support, greater self-efficacy, greater self-esteem, less depression, and less stress”.

To put it succinctly, if you help others more, you receive more help…and, oh, by the way, it lowers your blood pressure. For ideas on direct charitable giving to incredibly effective, but underfunded organizations, go to GiveWell.

And here are two others, closer to home, that you might consider:

Timmy Global Health

The Wounded Warrior Project

2. Helping Others Helps You Live Longer

Teach somebody to read, help a neighbor fix his fence, bring dinner to a shut-in and you’ll not only feel great about yourself, but you’ll live 22% longer. An analysis of over 40 scientific papers showed that people who help others get an average of ⅕ more life in which to help. While the study didn’t prove conclusively where the benefit comes from (whether a boost in, say chemicals like oxytocin, associated with positive emotions, or the direct social benefits of helping were causally related to the increase), there seems to be tremendous longevity benefit when it comes to lending a helping hand.

3. You’ve Heard of the “Runner’s High”? Well, There’s Also a “Helper’s High”

It turns out that, under clinical studies, the act of contributing to another person’s well-being actually releases endorphins — the chemical responsible for that sense of euphoria that runners experience as a result of a really great workout. It’s not just that helping can make you feel good, it’s that biologically speaking, there’s a direct chemical path between helping and feeling really, really good.

4. The Economy Runs on Trust

There’s been a lot of talk in the recent decades about the importance of competition in the Free Market. Our laws against monopolies are designed to sustain competitive environments. And in recent years, we’ve been running socio-economic experiments to determine whether increased competition from private charter schools makes for a better educational system. But, with all the talk of competition, we may forget that trust is absolutely fundamental to our economy (Forbes, July 2010).

In 2010, the World Bank estimated that, in the US, $12.4 trillion was directly attributable to established systems of trust. If the father of economic theory, Adam Smith, was correct and all economic systems are built on a foundation of specialized individual skills, Person A must trust Person B do whatever task that Person A does not have the time or resources to do. It follows, then, logically, that the less we trust one another, the more resources we are obligated to spend defending our own interests against each other.

5. Kindness is Contagious

For the first time in 2010, two researchers (Christakis and Fowler) were able to prove in laboratory conditions that cooperation and acts of kindness ripple outward through social interactions. That is, each kind act makes another kind act more likely to occur. In the study, research showed that not only did kindness propagate through a social group, but that it was likely to multiply by 3. A single smile at a barista will, on average, result in three smiles between the barista and customers, the customers and each other or the customer and a co-worker later in the day.

Whatever else we resolve to do or to be in 2016, let’s resolve to try to be kind to one another. If we try to understand where others have come from, what kind of day they might have had and choose to respond with kindness, it will make things better. Maybe not immediately and maybe not in every situation, but if we just keep trying, we will live longer, live better lives and pass that chance on to people around us.

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
8 Best-Selling Gift Sets for Book Lovers //wp.readers.com/blog/2014-best-sellers/ Wed, 03 Dec 2014 05:00:22 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11703 We’ve matched our best-selling reading glasses of 2014 with best-selling books from the New York Times (and some of our favorites, too!). If you’re looking for a genius gift for the bookworm in your life (or you’re ready to curl up by the fire this holiday season with a good read), these literary pairings are the perfect fit. […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
We’ve matched our best-selling reading glasses of 2014 with best-selling books from the New York Times (and some of our favorites, too!). If you’re looking for a genius gift for the bookworm in your life (or you’re ready to curl up by the fire this holiday season with a good read), these literary pairings are the perfect fit.

2014 Best-Selling Books

1. Gone Girl by Gillian Flynn

Gone Girl book

From the book by Gillian Flynn to the movie release, we can’t stop talking about Gone Girl. Pick up a copy of the novel and a pair of our Madden readers for the book lover in your life, and prepare them for lots of suspense and countless plot twists. Trust us, they won’t be able to put this book down!

2. How We Got to Now by Steven Johnson

Steven Johnson's How We Got to Now

If you’re looking to give a kick of inspiration, How We Got to Now: Six Innovations That Made the Modern World is your go-to gift. While wearing a pair of the scholarly Prescott readers, your friend will retrace history with Steven Johnson as he recalls how some of the greatest and most brilliant innovations came to life.

3. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks

Nicholas Sparks The Best of Me

We can always count on Nicholas Sparks to bring us a heart-wrenching, yet unbelievably exhilarating, romance. Throw in a pair of feminine Laura readers with this present. Just don’t be surprised when the lady you give this set to gets lost in The Best of Me.

4. Burn by James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge

Burn by James Patterson

James Patterson and Michael Ledwidge have teamed up again. This time the duo brings us Burn, an addition to the ever-so-thrilling Michael Bennett series. Give the gift of mystery with a pair of our Clover readers. See if your giftee can beat the detective to the punch and solve the crime first!

5. We Were Liars by E. Lockhart

We Were Liars Must-Read

When Cadence, a teenage protagonist, undergoes a strange and seemingly mysterious accident, a summer spent on her family’s private island turns out much differently than planned. Give We Were Liars with The Bates — and watch as the bookworm in your life gets tangled up in the web of lies surrounding Cadence’s accident.

6. Flash Boys by Michael Lewis

Flash Boys book

After his #1 best seller, The Big Short, Michael Lewis brings us another book centered around Wall Street with Flash Boys. After discovering unethical practices, a group of men working separately on Wall Street decide to come together in hopes of changing the financial markets. Give this book with the sharp-looking Bishop readers!

7. The Lost Key by Catherine Coulter

The Lost Key novel

Follow FBI agents Nicholas Drummond and Mike Caine in The Lost Key as they search for answers in a stabbing mystery on Wall Street. Give this suspenseful read with The Althorpe, and you’ll surprise someone with the challenge of locating the most important piece of evidence: the lost key.

8. The Fault in Our Stars by John Green

The Fault in Our Stars

Award-winning author John Green tells Hazel’s heartwarming story of living with a terminal cancer diagnosis. When Hazel joins a support group and meet Augustus, her life changes forever. The Fault in Our Stars, paired with The Studio, will have the book lover in your life laughing and crying. Don’t miss out on this best-seller — get this gift set for yourself this season.

Have you read any of these bestsellers? We’d love to hear what you thought — share with us on Facebook! Plus, let us know if there are any you’d add to this list of must-reads. 

Image sources: amazon.com

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Meet Dr. Ramani Durvasula: Psychologist and Relationship Coach //wp.readers.com/blog/holiday-traditions-advice/ Mon, 17 Nov 2014 22:05:44 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11995 Readers.com asked midlife topic experts to share special advice on everything from healthy living to planning for retirement. Our experts’ uplifting stories will inspire you to approach every situation with a Glass(es) Half Full mentality, so check back each month for more in this series and like us on Facebook for additional tips!  Meet Dr. Ramani Durvasula, our latest Glass(es) Half […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Midlife Advice

Readers.com asked midlife topic experts to share special advice on everything from healthy living to planning for retirement. Our experts’ uplifting stories will inspire you to approach every situation with a Glass(es) Half Full mentality, so check back each month for more in this series and like us on Facebook for additional tips! 

Meet Dr. Ramani Durvasula, our latest Glass(es) Half Full contributor! Dr. Ramani is a licensed clinical psychologist, professor of psychology, and relationship expert. Read her guest post below for advice on how to make the most of the holidays!

Enjoying the holidays

Dr. Ramani Durvasula

Dr. Ramani Durvasula

The holidays can spin out of control as we get older, our families grow, and our expectations get bigger. I think we all realize that the sweet spot and magic of the holidays is found in the experiences and not in the stuff (we’ve taken enough trips to Goodwill to recognize what happens to those gifts!). Here are my six tips to continue holiday traditions as your family gets bigger!

1. Trim it down.

As families get bigger, the gift-giving expectations can spin out of control. I have observed that large families will often do a gift exchange where they pick names out of a hat and set a budget.

2. Pay attention and build on the traditions you have in place.

Some families have traditions that are as old as the hills. You might feel like you don’t have any tradition, but you probably do! You just might not have realized that after 10 years of doing the same things, traditions are formed.

I am divorced, and yet my ex and I keep some key holiday traditions in place. One of our daughters is in high school, but her dad still leaves carrots and bells in his front lawn and the girls go look for them on Christmas morning (with some fake eye-rolling but tremendous appreciation). The family structure may have changed, but those traditions act as the glue that keeps us all connected. Cookie baking, tree trimming, menorah lighting — these simple things matter!

3. Make it about the kids.

The treasure of the holidays is watching adults make time for kids and seeing kids just be kids. Focus on the throwback elements of the holidays. For most of us, the holidays are an evocative time. Think about what you loved as a kid and what you wish had been different. Then, make it happen!

4. Don’t forget your friends.

The frenzied focus on family is lovely, but remember all of the people who are there for you the rest of the year, too. For many of us, particularly as we get older, it is our friends we rely on. Don’t lose that during the holiday season. Whether it’s a getaway, a party, a night out, or a gift exchange, make sure you celebrate your friends!

5. Give back.

Every agency in town hosts holiday events, and it can be wonderful to give back whether at a meal program or by providing gifts to families in need. It is a reminder of what this time of year should be about. Bonus points if you find a way to engage your family’s younger generations as well!

6. Let it go.

Lives and families change over time, and traditions might too. Your daughter may spend the holidays with her in-laws or you might lose a family member. Don’t make the holidays about ego and perceived rejection — be nimble and flexible in the face of change and find new ways to celebrate.

Thank you to Dr. Ramani Durvasula for sharing her advice with us just in time for the holidays! Be sure to stop by her website for more advice on everything from relationships to health and wellness.

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Give Back on December 15 at Readers.com! //wp.readers.com/blog/new-eyes-holiday-donation/ Mon, 10 Nov 2014 05:00:06 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11705 Giving back is near and dear to the Readers.com family. This holiday season, we’re donating to New Eyes for the Needy to provide reading glasses for adults and children around the world suffering from uncorrected vision. But, we need your help to make a difference!   Mark Your Calendar! The Details: We need your help. For […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Giving back is near and dear to the Readers.com family. This holiday season, we’re donating to New Eyes for the Needy to provide reading glasses for adults and children around the world suffering from uncorrected vision. But, we need your help to make a difference!  

Holiday Charity Donation

Mark Your Calendar!

The Details: We need your help. For every pair of reading glasses purchased on December 15, we’re donating to New Eyes for the Needy. As a bonus, you’ll receive free shipping on every order (with no minimum purchase necessary)!

How You Can Help: Shop Readers.com on December 15 — it’s really that easy. Treat yourself to an extra pair of reading glasses or sun readers, or purchase holiday gifts for your friends and family.

Stay Tuned: We’ll keep you posted on how you helped Readers.com give back to New Eyes and how our donation helped individuals in need.

About New Eyes for the Needy

The Mission: New Eyes for the Needy is a nonprofit organization that provides eyewear to adults and children in the U.S. and overseas who otherwise could not afford it.

The Stats: Uncorrected vision is a problem around the world that not only affects a person’s health, but their self-esteem. According to New Eyes, 11 million people in the U.S. alone struggle with their sight and cannot afford or access the eyeglasses they need.

The Effects of Uncorrected Vision: The effects of uncorrected vision vary according to age group. As you can imagine, children with poor eyesight struggle in the classroom and are at an increased risk for social and developmental delays. For older adults, the lack of eyeglasses could mean limited mobility.

How It Works: New Eyes for the Needy serves individuals of all ages through their voucher and eyewear recycling programs. When you give to this organization, 100% of your donation goes towards purchasing new glasses for an individual in need. Every glasses recipient is screened to ensure that donations are benefiting the people who need it most.

*Disclaimer: Readers.com will donate 10% of proceeds (up to $1,500) on December 15, 2014 to New Eyes for the Needy. This donation is only valid on purchases made on December 15, 2014 before midnight ET.

holiday ideas

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Our Readers Make a Difference in Mexico //wp.readers.com/blog/mission-trip-to-mexico/ Wed, 08 Oct 2014 14:32:11 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11693 Whether we’re helping youngsters in our community or donating to our favorite charities, giving back is near and dear to the Readers.com family. We’re excited to share how our friend Dave Strong, along with other mission members of the Fellowship Bible Church of Northwest Arkansas, paid it forward with our donated reading glasses! Each year the Fellowship Bible Church plans […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Readers.com Gives Back

Whether we’re helping youngsters in our community or donating to our favorite charities, giving back is near and dear to the Readers.com family. We’re excited to share how our friend Dave Strong, along with other mission members of the Fellowship Bible Church of Northwest Arkansas, paid it forward with our donated reading glasses!

Each year the Fellowship Bible Church plans an annual mission trip to Guadalajara, Mexico to provide much-needed medical care in the lower-income area of the city. This year, they brought along suitcases full of donated readers and prescription glasses to help the 800 men, women, and children that passed through the church’s medical clinic.

Readers.com Makes a Difference in Mexico

Mission leader Dave and his crew handed out over 250 readers and prescription glasses in just three days. Dave manned the eyewear station inside the clinic, and much to his surprise, he interacted with lots of children who wanted glasses — which he suggests is “a sad sign of the lack of proper nourishment they receive.”

To help determine if they needed readers, he asked each child to read a Bible verse in a variety of different font sizes. The kids wanted to show off their skills, but they struggled with reading the verses printed in smaller font sizes. Take a look at how Dave explains his heartfelt interaction with several 0f the kids: “Once they put the readers on, they immediately and proudly began reading the smallest font I had. They didn’t stop reading until they had read the entire verse. The children were truly blessed by the glasses.”

We want to thank Dave and the Fellowship Bible Church of Northwest Arkansas for making a difference in Guadalajara and putting our readers to good use!

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
Meet Rhonda Caudell: Family Caregiving Coach //wp.readers.com/blog/advice-on-being-a-caregiver/ Fri, 19 Sep 2014 13:31:48 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11367 Readers.com asked midlife topic experts to share special advice on everything from healthy living to planning for retirement. Our experts’ uplifting stories will inspire you to approach every situation with a Glass(es) Half Full mentality, so check back each month for more in this series and like us on Facebook for additional tips! This month’s […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
002463_rea_blog_series_glassesfull

Readers.com asked midlife topic experts to share special advice on everything from healthy living to planning for retirement. Our experts’ uplifting stories will inspire you to approach every situation with a Glass(es) Half Full mentality, so check back each month for more in this series and like us on Facebook for additional tips!

This month’s Glass(es) Half Full post is written by Rhonda Caudell. Rhonda is a relationship and communication expert who helps families work through caregiving solutions. She believes developing long-term strategies and focusing on the positive of caregiving, rather than the negative, can tremendously help families confront what can often be an emotional time. For more information on Rhonda’s Endless Legacy coaching services, visit her website! Read on for her expert guidelines and advice on:

How to Be a Better Caregiver

Rosalynn Carter once said: “There are only four kinds of people in the world, those who have been caregivers, those who are currently caregivers, those who will be caregivers, and those who will need caregivers.” If you are a caregiver or are just beginning to see signs that your aging parent is losing their ability to live independently in a safe manner, you are not alone. As the population ages and more people develop chronic illnesses, the number of adults who find themselves caring for a sick or elderly family member continues to increase.

Another common thread among these adults is that no matter your age, education, or life experiences, most people are at a loss when it comes to the “how-to” steps of caring for aging parents. If you still have one or both parents living and you choose to accept the fact that they may need your help as they continue to age, I offer you the following list of helpful strategies and tips. This methodology behind caregiving can positively affect both their future and yours!

Note: Perhaps you are already a parent caregiver and things aren’t going so well. If that’s the case, use these guidelines to help change your strategy as if you are starting all over.

Caregiving Tips and Advice from Rhonda Caudell

1. Assess the conversations you currently have with your parent(s):

  • Do you do most of the talking, or do they?
  • What are they saying, or not saying, about their future?
  • Are you truly using your best listening skills during conversations?
  • Does what they say and what they do match?
  • Is it difficult to get them to consider the possibility of needing help?
  • Do they treat you as if you are still their child and not a responsible adult?
  • Do you speak to them as if they are a child?

2. Adapt conversations and develop strategies that lead to a long-term care plan:

  • Ask questions and listen in a way that will allow your parents to open up to you about how they want to live out their final years.
  • Write down what they say even if it is not realistic. Your goal is to help them find a plan as close as possible to what they want, while keeping in mind what is realistic.
  • Have a family meeting to set guidelines for the future.
  • Reaffirm that all actions are from love and respect for the parents and will only be taken with their permission.
  • Plan steps and actions that will allow them to remain as independent as possible for as long as possible.
  • Solicit anyone’s help who is willing and list what actions they can provide.
  • Gather your team of professionals to help: legal, financial, in-home care providers, physicians, pharmacists, and social service providers (to name a few).
  • Identify others to help: church members, neighbors, friends, or extended family.

3. Implement the plan and adapt as situations change:

  • Create a communication system that allows everyone on the team to get regular updates and report the results of their actions.
  • Have backup plans and crisis prevention where possible.

If you work through these guidelines and still, none of your efforts seem to be working, it might be time to seek the assistance of an objective party. Get in touch with someone of integrity and authority who your parents trust, a professional conflict mediator, or a skilled geriatric care professional to help work through tough issues.

Thank you Rhonda for these helpful tips on developing an effective and thoughtful caregiving strategy! For more guidance from Rhonda, head on over to her coaching site Endless Legacy

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
For the Kids: The Readers.com Team Boards the Bookmobile! //wp.readers.com/blog/volunteering-with-red-cross-book-mobile/ Thu, 11 Sep 2014 14:19:28 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11349 At Readers.com, we strive to give back to our local community as much as we can! Recently, a few members of our team had the opportunity to spend the day volunteering with The American Red Cross of Greater Indianapolis on board their Bookmobile. We were paired up with this amazing organization through an event put […]

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>
At Readers.com, we strive to give back to our local community as much as we can! Recently, a few members of our team had the opportunity to spend the day volunteering with The American Red Cross of Greater Indianapolis on board their Bookmobile.

American Red Cross Bookmobile

We were paired up with this amazing organization through an event put together by United Way called Day of Caring. Days of Caring are coordinated throughout the year with a goal of connecting companies, individuals, and other groups who want to make a difference around their community. You can learn more about Days of Caring on the United Way of Central Indiana’s website.

Many of the United Way’s community initiatives are centered around education, like giving support to local teachers and improving the environment around schools. With that in mind, we were so excited to be paired with a cause that’s all about reading and providing children free access to books!

Bookmobile - The Red Cross of Greater Indianapolis

In the Red Cross’s Bookmobile, we traveled to six different schools around Johnson County, with a goal to give out over 350 children’s books (spoiler alert: we succeeded!). Students were able to climb onto the bus and pick out a book to take home with them. We gave books to a wide age range of children, from two to eight years old. All the kids were very excited to be able to take home a book, and with such a wide selection, everyone managed to find something they were interested in reading!

Our Director of Talent and Culture, Gabby VanAlstine, spoke highly of her time volunteering at the schools: “I had an amazing day on the Bookmobile! It was extremely gratifying to be able to help children choose books, as this program promotes literacy and an interest in lifelong learning. It was such an awesome experience — I would love to do it again sometime soon!”

Red Cross Bookmobile

To learn more about the Red Cross’s Bookmobile and their other community outreach programs, click here.

Thank you to both United Way and The American Red Cross for inviting us to join you for such a great day of service. We had a blast and can’t wait to do it again!

Back to Readers.com Blog. Did you know that we're on Twitter, too?

]]>