Hobbies and How To’s – The Fine Print Blog //wp.readers.com/blog by Readers.com Wed, 21 Feb 2018 15:33:10 +0000 en-US hourly 1 //wordpress.org/?v=4.8.3 //wp.readers.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-Rea-newFavicon-2016-Final-32x32.png Hobbies and How To’s – The Fine Print Blog //wp.readers.com/blog 32 32 Is this Website Legitimate? A Few Tips for Shopping Online //wp.readers.com/blog/how-to-tell-if-a-site-is-legit/ //wp.readers.com/blog/how-to-tell-if-a-site-is-legit/#respond Thu, 01 Dec 2016 19:14:03 +0000 //wp.readers.com/blog/?p=13934 Although the internet is a powerful tool (in 2015, e-commerce accounted for roughly 314 billion dollars in sales!), it’s important to remember that there are some websites you should not trust, especially when shopping online. The last thing you want is for your phone number, home address, or credit card number stolen from a fraudulent website. […]

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Although the internet is a powerful tool (in 2015, e-commerce accounted for roughly 314 billion dollars in sales!), it’s important to remember that there are some websites you should not trust, especially when shopping online. The last thing you want is for your phone number, home address, or credit card number stolen from a fraudulent website. For this reason, you need to be able to identify if the website is legitimate before purchasing anything on the internet. The good news, though, is that there are warning signs you can look out for to flag these sketchy websites! Keep reading to learn a few ways to tell if a site is secure and trustworthy when shopping online.

Buy From Sites That Have SSL Certificates

Check to see if a website is secure when shopping online. Sites that are trustworthy, or secure, have what’s called an SSL (Secure Sockets Layer) certificate. SSL-certified websites begin their URLs with “https”(the “s” stands for “secure”) instead of “http.” Secure websites also have a green padlock to the left of the URL. The difference between an HTTP website and an HTTPS website is how they transfer data. SSL certified sites (https) encrypt important data, such as credit card numbers, email addresses, and personal information so that outsiders cannot steal your information. This is why you should only trust online vendors that use an HTTPS URL when entering any valuable information.

The vast majority of websites that process payments have an SSL certificate. If you encounter a site that is not, you should not trust it.

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The red arrows above point to the areas in the URL you should check for SSL certificates.

Research the Company

One way to validate if you can trust a website is by looking for proof the company exists. When browsing the website, look for information about the company, including their physical address, phone number, and fax number. It’s a good sign if you are able to find a lot of information about the company. Other ways you can tell if a site is secure is by checking their privacy statement and verified icons. Privacy statements typically disclose that the company will not share your information, while verified icons mean that a company meets certain standards, depending on the logo.

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Look for privacy statements and verified icons when deciding if a site is legitimate.

Give the Company a Call

If you’re still unsure about whether or not you can trust the website, look for a phone number and give them a call. No phone number? Leave the site. If you get an automated voicemail or the number is no longer in service, this is also a good indication that the site should not be trusted. Finally, make sure to call during business hours, as many companies do not have a 24/7 call center. If you still do not get a response during the day, exercise caution and leave the website.

Use Familiar Sites

The safest way to shop online is to shop at places you know, or places that have been recommended to you by a friend. If you can’t decide whether or not to trust a site, play it safe and go with what you know!

Although the internet makes purchasing goods quick, simple, and convenient, it’s critical that you pay attention to where you shop. Look for signs that the site is secure (SSL certificate / “https”), company information, and valid phone numbers, fax numbers, and email addresses. Happy shopping!

 

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10 Steps for Exploring Your Genealogy //wp.readers.com/blog/steps-for-exploring-your-genealogy/ Wed, 11 May 2016 15:28:12 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13382 Are you interested in tracing your family history? It can be fun and rewarding to learn about your ancestors and discover your genetic past, but the scope of the task may also be a bit daunting. We’re hoping to make your search less overwhelming with this 10-step guide to exploring your genealogy. Here, we’ll show […]

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Are you interested in tracing your family history? It can be fun and rewarding to learn about your ancestors and discover your genetic past, but the scope of the task may also be a bit daunting. We’re hoping to make your search less overwhelming with this 10-step guide to exploring your genealogy. Here, we’ll show you how to start small and gradually work toward your goal. Let’s get started!

family tree

1. Start with what you know

Before you start collecting documents and searching for your ancestors online, you should begin by writing down what you know about yourself, your parents and your grandparents. For each person, you’ll want to know their name, date and place of birth, parents, spouse and date of marriage, place of marriage, and children and their dates and places of birth. Knowing all of this information for every person will make it much easier to travel back through your lineage.

2. Begin documenting your family tree

This is a good time to start organizing your information so it doesn’t build into a confusing mess of names and dates. Ancestry.com offers several free, useful forms you can print out and use to collect your data. There are also a number of online family tree makers you can use if you’d prefer to do everything electronically. It doesn’t matter which method you choose as long as you have one. Remember to be as thorough and organized as possible to make your task easier going forward.

3. Gather additional information from your relatives

There’s a good chance you won’t know all of the information we called for in the first step. After all, that’s a lot of dates and locations. Your relatives should be your first resource for filling in the gaps. Talk to your siblings, cousins, parents, or aunts and uncles to see if they know things you don’t. Travel as far back through your family history as you can, documenting what you know to be true.

4. Consult family records

Next, you’ll want to begin gathering any family records you have in your home and seeing what you can learn from them. These could be items such as scrapbooks, photo albums, diaries, letters, newspaper clippings, and certificates of birth, marriage, and death. Don’t forget to ask your relatives about any documents they might have in their possession.

5. Join online social groups and email lists

Sooner or later, you won’t be able to gather more information without using outside sources. The first thing you should do is try to find out if someone else has already mapped out part of your lineage. If this is the case, then a lot of your work has already been done! We recommend searching for online groups and forums in which fellow genealogy researchers can share any info they have about your family or point you in the right direction. It’s also a good idea to join a mailing list such as one of the many you can find on this page.

6. Visit a local Genealogical Society

Just as individuals interested in genealogy may already have knowledge about your family history, there are also privately-owned genealogical societies that can assist you. Most societies focus only on lineages in specific local counties, so you’ll want to find one near where your ancestors lived. Many organizations are online, but you may also be able to find physical locations that house local documents. You can begin your search for these societies here.

7. Consult state and local government records

If you intend to trace your family line back as far as possible, you will eventually need to look at government records. It may be helpful to start with state and county records, which will typically be held at the appropriate government buildings. These institutions may hold types of records that the federal government does not, namely: birth certificates, marriage certificates, divorce records, death records, deeds and wills.

8. Consult federal government records

The National Archives and Records Administration maintains documents dating as far back as the Revolutionary War, including census, military, immigration, naturalization and land records. However, the vast majority of these documents are not available online, which means you will need to visit the National Archives Building in Washington, D.C. or one of the Regional Archives buildings throughout the country, or purchase microfilm from NARA, in order to view these records. The official NARA website provides a useful guide for beginning your genealogical research.

9. Join a genealogical website

If you’ve come this far and are really serious about finding your roots, you should consider joining an ancestry website like Ancestry.com or Findmypast.com. These sites require you to subscribe for a monthly fee, but they provide digital access to a wide array of government and non-government documents you won’t be able to find anywhere else online. The cost of using these websites is often worth the convenience and breadth of knowledge they provide.

10. Invest in a computer program

Paper documents, charts and forms add up quickly as you progress through your ancestry, making it increasingly difficult to stay organized. Purchasing software dedicated to building family trees and archiving relevant information will make your life a lot easier. Investigate programs such as Ancestral Quest, FAMware and Legacy to see which one you like best. Many offer free trials or free versions with fewer features.

We hope this article helps you on your genealogical journey! If you have tips or info for fellow ancestry researchers, let us know on Twitter or Facebook.

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9 Things You Didn’t Know About “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing” //wp.readers.com/blog/9-facts-about-race-day/ Mon, 09 May 2016 17:35:10 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13379 As warm weather inches its way to the Midwest, we can’t help but look forward to what we view as the start of summer: Memorial Day weekend. For most people, Memorial Day weekend will consist of heading to the pool or grilling out with family and friends. But if you’re a Hoosier, chances are that […]

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As warm weather inches its way to the Midwest, we can’t help but look forward to what we view as the start of summer: Memorial Day weekend. For most people, Memorial Day weekend will consist of heading to the pool or grilling out with family and friends. But if you’re a Hoosier, chances are that race day is on your mind.

The Indy 500, also known as “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing”, is celebrating its 100th running on May 29th. If you’re not from the Hoosier State and don’t know about the long list of traditions that surround Memorial Day weekend, we’re here to help. With over a century of history, we’ve put together a list of things that might surprise you about the Indianapolis 500. And if you are an Indiana native, you may still be surprised about the foundation of some of the infamous traditions seen on race day.

indianapolis 500

1. The race wasn’t always on the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend.

In fact, race day always took place on Memorial Day proper (May 30th) until the Uniform Monday Holiday Act (1971) moved the holiday to the last Monday of May. Before 1971, the Indy 500 always took place on May 30th, no matter which day of the week the holiday fell. The one exception? The race would not be run on a Sunday. Today, it’s always run on Sunday unless poor weather forces the race to be postponed.

2. A headlining concert has performed on Carb Day since 1998.

Carb day, short for Carburetion Day, is the Friday before the race. When cars still used carburetors (over 40 years ago), this day was used for drivers and their teams to make adjustments. Although the cars no longer use carburetors, the name “Carb Day” stuck, and today it represents the last day of practice for the drivers. Since 1998, Carb Day has featured a headlining musical artist. This year will feature Journey.

3. There is a non-profit dedicated solely to celebrating the spirit and legacy of the race.

The 500 Festival hosts events throughout the year to build excitement for the race. Two of their biggest events include the Indianapolis Mini-Marathon and the 500 Festival Parade.

4. A variety of songs and a parade are part of the pre-race festivities.

Actually, there are a plethora of pre-race songs that play before the infamous exclamation, “Gentlemen, start your engines!” The most notable of these traditions are the singing of “Back Home Again in Indiana” with a ballon release, and the Purdue All-American Marching Band’s performance of “On the Banks of the Wabash” and “Stars and Stripes Forever.” About two hours before the race there is a parade around the track featuring the 500 Festival Queen and Princesses, celebrities in attendance, and basically anyone else that is important.

5. Winners drink milk.

Forget champagne, we want milk! This obscure tradition began in 1936 when driver Louis Meyer asked for buttermilk after winning the 500. The Milk Foundation took advantage of this bizarre drink choice on a hot day and photographed the scene to try and bump sales. Milk was not available from 1947-55, but the tradition was brought back to the track in 1956.

6. There are multiple trophies.

Well, kind of. There’s the famous Borg-Warner Trophy that features relief sculptures of all the past winners along with numerous stats. The trophy itself is valued at over 1 million dollars and weighs roughly 110 lbs. Because the actual trophy is not given to the winner (it remains in Hall of Fame at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway), winners receive an 18-inch replica affectionately called the “Baby Borg” trophy.

7. This is the first time you can watch the race live in Indianapolis in 50 plus years.

The race, which you can watch live pretty much anywhere else in the United States, had to be watched by Indianapolis residents on Sunday afternoons until this year. The reasoning for “blacking out” the race was to get more people out to the track on race day. But because the race sold out for the first time in a long time (possibly ever, as the IMS never releases their attendance numbers), they have decided to lift the blackout, allowing Indianapolis folks the ability to watch the race live for the first time since the 1950s.

8. 100th running is not the same as the 100th annual.

Indianapolis is celebrating its 100th running of the Indy 500, not to be confused with 100th annual. Although the first race took place in 1911, the race was actually canceled from 1917-18 because of World War I. During that time the Speedway was used as an airstrip serving as a fuel stop for the Air Force. That race was again suspended from 1942-45 because of World War II.

9. Winners kiss the bricks.

The Speedway was originally made up of 3.2 million paving bricks. Over the years, the track has been updated and since 1961, the only bricks remaining are the 36-in strip at the start / finish. The first driver to kiss the bricks was Dale Jarrett in 1996, who began the tradition. Since then, victors kiss the bricks to pay tribute to the IMS (Indianapolis Motor Speedway).

Did you learn something new? We hope so! If you have any other traditions you want to share, let us know in the comments section or give us a shout on our Facebook page. Get ready for Memorial Day weekend, it should be a hot one!

 

 

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11 Tips from Experts To Conquer Your First National Park //wp.readers.com/blog/11-tips-from-experts-to-conquer-your-first-national-park/ Fri, 15 Apr 2016 17:20:22 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13328 The Grand Canyon. Yellowstone. The Great Smoky Mountains. Yosemite. We can picture them all — vast, grand, and beautiful. But have you seen them with your own two eyes, hiked their trails, and been fully immersed in their wilderness? With National Park Week (plus free admission!) upon us and summer quickly approaching, we think it’s time […]

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clingmans dome national park

The Grand Canyon. Yellowstone. The Great Smoky Mountains. Yosemite.

We can picture them all — vast, grand, and beautiful. But have you seen them with your own two eyes, hiked their trails, and been fully immersed in their wilderness? With National Park Week (plus free admission!) upon us and summer quickly approaching, we think it’s time for you to head to your nearest national park.

To provide some helpful tips for planning your next trip to a national park, we’ve interviewed Steve and Sheila Condra, a couple that has been heading to the outdoors for years. Together they’ve tackled 27 national parks, 13 national monuments, 15 national historic parks, and a variety of national battlefields, seashores, lakeshores, and scenic trails. Needless to say, they know a thing or two about the National Park Service.

bryce canyon national park

Allison, Sheila, Amanda, and Steve Condra at Grand Canyon National Park

11 Tips from the Experts:

1. Just Go

My number one tip for visiting national parks is to just go.  There are so many opportunities available to be enjoyed, but can only be truly experienced in person. No matter what anyone may tell you, pictures cannot compare to live experiences.  I’ve probably been to the Grand Canyon a dozen times, but each trip holds new and exciting discoveries. No amount of pictures can give you the feeling of walking up to the south rim in person and feeling the awesomeness that nature has presented to us.

clingmans dome national park

Great Smoky Mountains National Park — the Condra family’s “favorite”

2. Do Your Research

Know what to expect from any particular park and research in advance. If possible, plan your allotted time there based upon your preferences. Learn the history of the park and why it was chosen to be included into the park system.

3. Plan for Weather

Know what weather you may encounter and plan accordingly. Do I need a raincoat? Nothing dampens your spirits more than being wet, cold, and uncomfortable. Should I dress in layers? The temperature may vary as much as 50 degrees in some parks. Always pack some sunscreen; even cloudy days outdoors can result in nasty sunburns that can affect the rest of your stay.

4. Don’t Forget Food

Plan food and drink. Most parks aren’t blessed with readily accessible restaurants and/or stores. Always carry some water with you and stay hydrated. Snacks, such as nuts, trail mix and possible fresh fruits have saved the day for us on many occasions.

5. Wear the Right Clothes

Clothing designed for the activities you’ve anticipated make the visit much more enjoyable. Plan on some exercise and wear clothing that allows freedom of movement and won’t chafe. Also, clothing designed to keep you dry and warm, or cool if the situation requires, will allow you to have a more enjoyable experience.

yosemite national park

Amanda and Allison Condra in Yosemite National Park in 1999

6. Good Shoes are a Must

Wear the proper footwear for the environment— sore, wet or blistered feet are the absolute worst. Especially in back country experiences, don’t scrimp on footwear. Buy the best you can afford and make sure they are well broken in before you start on a trek.

7. Make a Few “Dry Runs”

If you plan to hike and/or camp, make a few “dry runs” locally starting with short trails and overnight camps so that you can get acclimated to the process. Along the way, learn which items are really necessities and which items are seldom used or needed. Don’t carry a five-pound hatchet on a thirty-mile wilderness hike if it is not needed. Minimal equipment is always preferred, in my opinion, and requires less energy to be expended, allowing for a more pleasant experience.

8. Remember, You’re in Nature

Learn what wildlife may be encountered, how to identify them, and what precautions may be necessary. Carry pepper spray if a there’s a possibility you could encounter a bear. Learn to identify poisonous spiders and snakes and how to avoid them. In all of our travels we have never run across a bear in the wild, nor a poisonous snake, but there is always a small chance that it could happen. It’s always best to “Be Prepared”, as my old scouting days taught me.

Speaking of preparation… there are no bathrooms in nature! 

9. Talk to Knowledgeable People

Talk to people about their experiences, before and while visiting parks. Information gained may be very helpful and very current while planning you daily visit to a park. For example, knowing that the elk are in a particular valley might allow you to see them when they would be otherwise missed.

10. Be Respectful

While visiting, be respectful of other guests. Stay quiet on trails and allow others to get those perfect photos. Also, respect the park by not leaving behind trash, causing damage to features, or carrying out rocks, flowers, etc. As the saying goes, “Take Only Memories, Leave only Footprints.”

canoyonlands national park

Canyonlands National Park in 2009

11. Consider a Pass and a Passport

Purchasing a National Parks Pass provides admission for one year to all national parks that have an admission fee. You can also buy a National Parks Passport to document all of your visits. Visitor Centers have cancellation stamps to stamp passports that show the location and date. That is how our daughter, Amanda, was able to make her list of places she had visited! 

With the 100th anniversary of the National Parks, it’s never been a better time to take a trip!

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Driving through Sequoia National Park in 1961

sequoia national park vintage

Steve and his family at Sequoia National Park in 1958

 

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5 Easter Traditions To Start Doing With Your Family This Year //wp.readers.com/blog/5-easter-traditions-for-your-family Mon, 21 Mar 2016 19:18:32 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13246 Easter is right around the corner and we’re using the holiday to celebrate all things spring-related. From planting flowers, to cooking a big brunch, Easter traditions are a fun, memorable way to spend time with your family and get excited for warmer weather. Below are five of our favorite Easter traditions — maybe you’ve already […]

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Easter is right around the corner and we’re using the holiday to celebrate all things spring-related. From planting flowers, to cooking a big brunch, Easter traditions are a fun, memorable way to spend time with your family and get excited for warmer weather. Below are five of our favorite Easter traditions — maybe you’ve already been doing them for years, or maybe you can make this year the first of many more to come.

1. Decorate Your Own Easter Eggs

Dying Easter eggs is a classic tradition that you probably did as a kid, too. Buy a few kits at the grocery store and call it a day, or get a little craftier. You can decorate eggs with puffy paint, confetti, and anything else that sparks your fancy from the craft store. Just don’t forget to boil the eggs, first!

If you’re looking for some more ways to get creative with Easter eggs, we love this guide by Sunlit Spaces: 14 Fantastic Ways to Decorate Easter Eggs.

decorating easter eggs

2. Make (And Mail) Easter Cards

Handwritten cards are always a kind gesture. Teach your kids or your grandkids the art of sending letters by making your own Easter cards to send, snail-mail style, to friends and family. Construction paper and markers will do just fine, or you can find a template online, like this one by Martha Stewart.

3. Bake an Easter Quiche

Who doesn’t love a hearty Easter brunch with loved ones? If you’re getting sick of deviled eggs, try a quiche. It’s easy to make and you can prepare it ahead of time so you can spend less time in the kitchen, and more time enjoying the day with your family. If you don’t already have a quiche recipe in your lineup, check out these 9 different variations that are perfect for the occasion.

easter quiche

4. Host an Easter Egg Hunt

The main event — a neighborhood Easter egg hunt. Why not be the host this year? Recruit your kids or grandkids to help you fill up hollow, plastic Easter eggs (which you can usually find at a dollar store) with different treats and prizes.

This is where things get fun. You can stuff your eggs with candy, toys, gift cards, cash — whatever you think is best! Check out this article for even more tips and ideas for hosting the perfect egg hunt.

5. Plant Tulips

One of the most popular potted flowers to buy around Easter-time are tulips. Did you know that you can plant tulip bulbs outside after they’ve bloomed? This is a fun Easter day or after-Easter activity for you and your family, especially if you give each other potted tulips as a gift.

spring tulips

Sometimes it takes up to two years for the tulips to bloom again once they’ve been replanted, but you can make it a tradition each year to check on them and even plant a few more! For more detailed instructions on how to replant your tulip bulbs, take a look at this article.

How are you planning to spend Easter this year? We’d love to hear about your traditions, new and old. Give us a shout on Twitter or Facebook!

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Holiday Planning Checklist for Less Stress //wp.readers.com/blog/holiday-countdown/ Tue, 03 Nov 2015 05:00:01 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11710 Make the most of the holiday season by staying on top of your to-do list. Don’t worry — we’ve created a checklist so you won’t forget a single task and (most importantly) so you can enjoy the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas!

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Make the most of the holiday season by staying on top of your to-do list. Don’t worry — we’ve created a checklist so you won’t forget a single task and (most importantly) so you can enjoy the weeks between Thanksgiving and Christmas!

Holiday Planning Guide

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Holiday Traditions Old & New to Try This Year //wp.readers.com/blog/holiday-traditions/ Sun, 01 Nov 2015 04:00:58 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11716 The stockings are hung, the gifts wrapped, and the menu planned. But when it comes to making the most out of the holiday season, it’s the time spent with loved ones that makes us merriest this time of year. Whether you’re looking for all-new activities for the whole family or simply refreshing your tried-and-true holiday […]

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The stockings are hung, the gifts wrapped, and the menu planned. But when it comes to making the most out of the holiday season, it’s the time spent with loved ones that makes us merriest this time of year.

Whether you’re looking for all-new activities for the whole family or simply refreshing your tried-and-true holiday plans, grab some inspiration from our list of holiday traditions to try!

Holiday traditions to try this year

  1. Explore the lights around your city (don’t forget the hot cocoa!)
  2. Write letters to each other, seal them, and wait to read them until the holidays next year
  3. Have a pajama party and holiday movie marathon
  4. Bake and decorate Christmas cookies together
  5. Set up a food/drink bar (try cheese displays and a make-your-own Bloody Mary stand!)
  6. Volunteer your time at a local soup kitchen
  7. Host a white elephant gift exchange
  8. Count down to Christmas by unwrapping a holiday book each day of December
  9. Purchase a new unique ornament each year
  10. Have a gingerbread house competition
  11. Go ice skating and head to an outdoor rink if you have one near you
  12. Buy matching PJs for the family to wear on Christmas morning (this makes for great photos!)
  13. Camp out in front of the tree for a night, share holiday stories, and eat sweet treats
  14. Assign everyone a different line and sing “The 12 Days of Christmas” (make sure to catch it on video!)
  15. Reminisce over 2015 with your family and reflect on how you’d like to grow

How do you celebrate the season each year? Share your traditions with us on Facebook!

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5 Reading Glasses to Wear on Halloween //wp.readers.com/blog/reading-glasses-for-halloween/ Wed, 21 Oct 2015 13:00:59 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13162 Halloween is right around the corner … have you thought about your costume yet? Whether you’re passing out candy to trick-or-treaters, or heading to a monster mash, we’ve got a few costumes (for both women and men) that pair well with your favorite readers. Take a look, and happy haunting! For Women 1. Witch Costume […]

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reading glasses to wear on halloween
Halloween is right around the corner … have you thought about your costume yet? Whether you’re passing out candy to trick-or-treaters, or heading to a monster mash, we’ve got a few costumes (for both women and men) that pair well with your favorite readers.

Take a look, and happy haunting!

For Women

1. Witch Costume

Witch Costume

A little bit spooky, a little bit chic. Add a little color to a classic witch costume with pops of green and a purple dress (that you can totally wear again).

Wear: The Lynn Polka Dot Reader

2. Flapper Girl Costume

Flapper Girl

Take it back to the days of prohibition and Gatsby with this roaring ’20s costume. With a swingy dress and a few fun accessories, you’ll be the life of the Halloween party.

Wear: The Ingrid Rhinestone Reader

3. Breakfast at Tiffany’s Costume

Breakfast at Tiffany's Costume

You can’t go wrong with this timeless classic. Channel your inner Audrey in strands of pearls, a rhinestone tiara, and of course, a tinted pair of retro square reading glasses that radiate cool.

Wear: The Arizona Bifocal Sun Reader

For Men

4. Where’s Waldo Costume

Where's Waldo

Pull from items you likely already have in your closet for this humorous Halloween costume everyone will love. The finishing touch on your Where’s Waldo costume are our round, thick-framed readers you’ll wear over and over again.

Wear: The Architect

5. Mad Scientist

Mad Scientist

Wacky and weird, this mad scientist costume is sure to put a smile on some faces this Halloween. Find an inexpensive white lab coat, and top it off with lab-inspired accessories like a clipboard, bottles, and reading glasses.

Wear: The Walter Bifocal

No matter which costume you choose to wear on October 31, we hope you have a fun, safe Halloween filled with sweet treats and friends. Happy Halloween!

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5 Pumpkin Recipes You'll Love This Fall //wp.readers.com/blog/pumpkin-recipes-fall/ Thu, 01 Oct 2015 04:00:27 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=11537 Fall is upon us and you know what that means — time for pumpkin everything! If you find yourself craving a bit more time in your kitchen as the weather cools and the days get shorter, we’ve got just what you need to bring the warm, cozy (slightly healthier) tastes of fall into your home! […]

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5 Pumpkin Recipes for Fall

Fall is upon us and you know what that means — time for pumpkin everything! If you find yourself craving a bit more time in your kitchen as the weather cools and the days get shorter, we’ve got just what you need to bring the warm, cozy (slightly healthier) tastes of fall into your home! Add these five pumpkin recipes to your fall favorites, and don’t forget to follow us on Pinterest for even more kitchen inspirations. Happy cooking!

1. Pumpkin Oatmeal Cookies

From Sally’s Baking Addiction

Pumpkin and Oatmeal Cookies
There’s nothing quite like warm, fresh-from-the-oven oatmeal cookies when fall rolls around. What makes these seasonal treats even tastier? Pumpkin, of course! This particular recipe lists three different variations of the same recipe, that way you can test and try out a few different cookie combos. For easy step-by-step instructions (and delectable photos along the way), click here!

2. Creamy Pumpkin Soup

From The Comfort of Cooking

Creamy Pumpkin Soup
This savory soup is just what you and your family need to balance out all the sweet baking you’ll be doing this fall! Talk about a versatile recipe — this soup is the perfect dinner solution, especially once temperatures start to drop. Make a batch and top it with extras for a complete meal, or make it as a side dish to complement your main course at a dinner party. For the recipe details, click here!

3. Pumpkin Spice Granola

From Joyful Healthy Eats

Homemade Pumpkin Spice Granola
Homemade granola is easy to make and healthy to eat! This pumpkin-spice version is the perfect topping for granola, fruit, and really anything else you can think of! Double your batch so that you can keep some for yourself, and then give away the rest to friends and neighbors as a Happy Fall treat. Read the full recipe, here!

4. Roasted Pumpkin Seed Hummus

From Half Baked Harvest

Pumpkin Hummus
Try this hummus and we know you’ll be finding reasons to make it all season long! From crackers and pita bread to sandwich spreads and salad toppers, this roasted pumpkin seed hummus goes with just about anything. The recipe uses simple, wholesome ingredients and is easy to follow. Details here!

5. Pumpkin Waffles

From No. 2 Pencil

Pumpkin Waffles Homemade
This is one the kids will love! Saturday morning breakfast just got a hundred times better with these pumpkin waffles. Check out the step-by-step instructions here along with tips for keeping your waffles crispy (never soggy!) when serving for a crowd — perfect for when your kids want to host a fall slumber party!

What are you excited to cook up in the kitchen this fall? Share your favorite fall recipe with us on Facebook! We’d love to try it out ourselves. 🙂

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5 Ways to Try Something New This Fall //wp.readers.com/blog/five-new-activities-for-fall Wed, 09 Sep 2015 13:00:35 +0000 //www.readers.com/blog/?p=13086 A new season is all about new beginnings, and here at Readers.com, we look for any reason we can to try something new. Trying new things can feel daunting, but pushing yourself to live outside your comfort zone is one of the most rewarding things you can do, at any stage of life. We love […]

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5 Ways to try Something New This Fall

A new season is all about new beginnings, and here at Readers.com, we look for any reason we can to try something new.

Trying new things can feel daunting, but pushing yourself to live outside your comfort zone is one of the most rewarding things you can do, at any stage of life. We love the fact that wearing reading glasses can help you not only do the things you already enjoy doing, but show you that it’s never too late to try something new as well.

Check out these 5 ways to try something new this fall, and make sure you stock up with the best readers to help you along the way.

1. Take a Cooking Class

Even if you’ve been preparing meals for the family for decades, a cooking class can totally change your perspective on your approach to the kitchen. A great activity to do with your spouse or partner, a cooking class makes for a great date night or afternoon excursion.

Try out a class at your local Sur La Table or Williams Sonoma, or find something off the beaten path. And if you really want to sharpen your culinary chops, consider enrolling in a six-week course. You’ll be amazed at how much you can learn!

2. Go to a Yoga Workshop

Whether you’ve never been to a yoga class or you practice daily, it’s never a bad idea to brush up on the basics. Many local yoga studios and gyms offer Intro to Yoga workshops that last as little as a few hours, or as long as an entire weekend.

Grab a friend, grab a mat, and go try something new that’s not only relaxing and stress-relieving, but great for your overall physical health.

Wondering where to begin? Download the free MINDBODY app to see what local yoga studios in your area have to offer.

3. Visit a Museum

If you’re like most of us, there is probably a museum or two in your hometown (or at least near your hometown) that somehow you’ve just never been to. Our hometown of Indianapolis is full of amazing museums that we need to take better advantage of!

Pop into your local art museum on a Sunday afternoon, or make an entire day of it. If you live in the suburbs of a bigger city, take a little road trip with the grandkids to a museum you can all enjoy. You’ll learn something new and have a lot of fun along the way.

4. Walk for a Cause

You don’t have to be an elite runner to participate in a 5k race. Walk one, instead! Complete the race with just you and your headphones, or register with a group and have some fun doing training walks leading up to the big day.

Many 5k races are attached to charitable causes. Just google a particular cause you care about and see if there are any upcoming races or walks you can join. This tool is also great for finding 5k events in your local town.

5. Learn to Read Music

Maybe you grew up taking piano lessons but have gotten rusty over the years. Or maybe you can play guitar by ear, but you never learned to read the notes. Either way, it’s never too late to learn!

While private lessons are the fastest way to learn something like reading music, there are countless other methods out there today. YouTube is an awesome resource for tutorials on learning to play instruments and reading music, in addition to course-based web programs like those on Udemy and Skillshare.

Find the method that works best for you, set a goal, and have fun!

How are you planning to try something new this fall? Why not get started on the right foot with a brand new pair of readers? You’ll be glad you did!

Shop Reading Glasses Now >

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