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Eye Health Videos

Have questions about your eye health? These informational videos answer some frequently asked questions about vision changes as we age, finding the right reading magnification, and the importance of yearly eye exams.

 

Why Does My Vision Change Over Time?

Dr. Diana Fisher OD of 20/20 Lasik explains how our vision changes frequently over the years, but that the biggest changes occur before we reach 30. Whether we're ready or not, our eyes generally go through a change around the age of 40, causing the need for reading glasses.

 

Finding the Best Magnification

Although you may have one reading power you prefer, depending on the distance of the material you're reading and the type of work, you might need to also try a step up or down in magnification. Optometrist Dr. Fisher OD explains why.

 

How Often Do I Need To Visit The Eye Doctor?

Visits to the eye doctor aren't just to check your vision. Total preventative eye care can help catch any underlying conditions, as well as ensure you have the eye correction you need.

 

Presbyopia and Reading Magnification for Those With Eye Diseases

How does your distance vision correction work with your reading power? Dr. Diana Fisher OD explains how the two work together, as well as the need for higher magnifications for those with eye diseases.

 

How Do Computer Reading Glasses Help?

Computer glasses are beneficial for eyes of every age. Dr. Diana Fisher OD explains how they work, and why it's important you give your eyes a break from digital devices!

 

What to Expect at Your Eye Exam

Visiting the eye doctor each year will help to keep your eyes healthy and your vision in check. Dr. Diana Fisher OD walks through what to expect at your appointment.

 

How To Clean Your Reading Glasses

Keep your vision as clear as possible with these reading glasses cleaning tips!

Disclaimer: All references to "bifocals" herein refer to readers having unmagnified lens containing a "bifocal style" single powered reading glass insert located on the lower portion of the lenses.